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August 27, 2014

Strategy Briefing: Opportunities and Challenges in Global Participatory Sport

250_particSport-v1.1According to our new report, health and vanity have been the two largest influencers on consumer exercise.  Obesity has been identified largely as a public health issue due to excessive amounts of media coverage. Therefore, governments around the world have started many initiatives to encourage consumers to exercise more.  Some have even increased funding for public sports facilities or provided tax incentives. 

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Physical attractiveness has also been an important aspect of exercise, as mass media applies much pressure on the consumer to appear perfect, with many ads featuring airbrushed models.  This aspirational perfectionism has not only fuelled interest in exercise but has also increased body disorders, which have also risen over the past decade.

Some of the latest popular exercises include extreme sports such as rock climbing and adventure sports such as triathlons. Many health clubs continued to see growth in developed countries as well, even in spite of the recession.

The increased participation in exercise has led to marketing opportunities and product success in many industries, particularly apparel.  Sportswear sales have consistently outperformed the wide apparel market over recent years, with outdoor clothing becoming popular. 

“There are many market opportunities within apparel, health and supplements, sports and energy drinks, and electronics to cater to the exercise and health conscious consumer,” says Editorial Director, Gina Westbrook.  “Our report really highlights opportunities and challenges globally within exercise and sports consumption.”

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August 25, 2014

The Scottish Referendum: Better Together or Divided We Stand?

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How would an independent Scotland look, in comparison with a UK without Scotland? In terms of total consumer market size, the UK without Scotland would not see a drop in its position in global rankings. An independent Scotland would become the world’s 45th largest consumer market, finding itself placed in-between Finland and Peru. In terms of average household spend, the average household in the UK without Scotland would be higher than its Scottish equivalent in all categories with the exception of alcoholic drinks and tobacco, and clothing and footwear.

 

By Sarah Boumphrey

 

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August 21, 2014

Three Trends in Primary Education in Emerging Markets

 

The emphasis of primary education in emerging markets is an important trend as primary education leads to secondary and tertiary education, therefore leading to a higher skilled workforce as a whole. Emerging markets are increasingly prioritizing primary education as a means to ensure productivity and competitiveness against other markets.

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Big Data: What’s the Big Deal?

Pavel_MarceuxAnalyst Insight by Pavel Marceux - Technology, Communications and Media Contributing Analyst

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The digitalisation of business and consumption brought on by the widespread use of the Internet has created a dilemma for companies: what to do with all that data? The concept of Big Data has been borne out of this excess information lying on servers, devices and web pages across vast networks and mainframes. The growing realisation that data can actually be harvested, monetised and strategised is the underlying ideology behind the implementation of Big Data, which is creating entire industries and offering businesses additional revenue streams from previously dormant sources. Opportunities in Big Data are considerable, but strong human and capital resources are necessary to organise and utilise it accordingly.

Broadband Business Use and Population Internet Penetration in Selected Economies: 2013

Source: Euromonitor International from UNCTAD/Eurostat/International Telecommunications Union/OECD/national statistics

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August 18, 2014

The Rich World of Emerging Markets

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High-income earners in emerging economies are a diverse group and what constitutes a high income is dramatically different across countries. The relative wealth of the highest earners, when compared to low and middle income consumers within their own countries, can also be poles apart. Winning over this group can be crucial for market success particularly in categories such as transport, education and hotels and catering where they dominate consumer spending.

A Seven-Fold Difference

Looking at the disposable incomes of decile 10 households – the highest earning 10% of households – across the world’s largest 20 emerging markets, reveals stark differences.  The richest of the rich are in Saudi Arabia where decile 10 incomes are more than 7 times higher than the rich in Pakistan, the lowest-earning decile 10 households in this ranking. A decile 10 Pakistani household earns US$17,332 which places it on a par with the lowest earning 20% of households in the USA.

Average Disposable Income of a Decile 10 Household in the World’s 20 Largest Emerging Markets: 2013

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Source: Euromonitor International from national statistics

Note:  Deciles are calculated by ranking all of the households in a country by disposable income level, from the lowest-earning to the highest earning. The ranking is then split into 10 equal sized groups of households. Decile 1 refers to the lowest earning 10%, through to Decile 10, which refers to the highest earning 10% of households.

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August 16, 2014

China Dominates Boom in Emerging Market Patent Grants

Patent Trends in Emerging Markets

The increasing prioritisation of research and development in emerging markets is resulting in a sharp growth in the number of patents being registered among them. China had by far the highest number of patents granted at its national patent office of emerging markets at just under 257,000 in 2013, representing 72.4% of total developing market patent grants. Patents enable countries to benefit exclusively from their research and gain a competitive advantage over others.

 

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August 15, 2014

Eurozone Q2 GDP Figures Point to a Bump in the Road Rather than a Return to Recession

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Yesterday’s dismal eurozone Q2 GDP results appear to show the fragile recovery derailed. Real GDP growth for the bloc was flat at 0.0% quarter-on-quarter. The most notable results were the negative growth in the eurozone’s largest economy – Germany – and also it’s third largest Italy – which is now in the midst of a triple dip recession. Meanwhile, France – the second largest economy – saw flat growth.

Quarter-on-Quarter Real GDP Growth in the Eurozone: Q2 2014

SB1Source: Eurostat

Note: Q2 data for Ireland, Greece, Luxembourg, Malta and Slovenia have yet to be released

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August 12, 2014

Who Will Gain Most from Russia’s Food Import Sanctions?

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Headlines abound about Russian agricultural sanctions against the EU, Norway, USA, Canada and Australia. Russia’s biggest food imports include meat and poultry, vegetables, fruits and tree nuts and dairy products all of which contain some food products covered by the sanctions. So just who will fill the gap left by the banned countries?

Russia’s Imports of Food Stuffs by 2 Digit HS Code: 2013

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Source: UN COMTRADE

Key: 01 Live animals; 02 Meat and edible meat offal; 03 Fish and crustaceans, molluscs and other aquatic invertebrates; 04 Dairy produce; birds' eggs; natural honey; edible products of animal origin, not elsewhere specified or included; 05 Products of animal origin, not elsewhere specified or included; 06 Live trees and other plants; bulbs, roots and the like; cut flowers and ornamental foliage; 07 Edible vegetables and certain roots and tubers; 08 Edible fruit and nuts; peel of citrus fruit or melons; 09 Coffee, tea, mate and spices;  10 Cereals; 11 Products of the milling industry; malt; starches; inulin; wheat gluten;  12 Oil seeds and oleaginous fruits; miscellaneous grains, seeds and fruit; industrial or medicinal plants; straw and fodder; 13 Lac; gums, resins and other vegetable saps and extracts;  14 Vegetable plaiting materials; vegetable products not elsewhere specified or included; 15 Animal or vegetable fats and oils and their cleavage products; prepared edible fats; animal or vegetable waxes; 16 Preparations of meat, of fish or of crustaceans, molluscs or other aquatic invertebrates; 17 Sugars and sugar confectionery; 18 Cocoa and cocoa preparations; 19 Preparations of cereals, flour, starch or milk; pastry cooks' products; 20 Preparations of vegetables, fruit, nuts or other parts of plants; 21 Miscellaneous edible preparations

 

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August 11, 2014

Holidays and Vacations in the Post-Recession Economy

image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14081116/58cb68db-b3a6-496d-895d-2ad7e892d496.pngAnalyst Insight by Daphne Kasriel-Alexander, Consumer Trends Consultant

Consumers are slowly adopting pre-recession spending habits in all aspects of their lives, and vacations and holidays are no different. In 2014, consumers aren’t restricting themselves to “staycations”, although they remain budget-conscious when travelling.  Many consumers are taking camping holidays, family trips and staying with friends in order to leave their dwellings but stay within their budgets.

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Turkey’s Five Big Challenges

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Turkey’s first direct presidential election has shone a spotlight on the economy’s key challenges. With real GDP growth expected to come in at just 2.2% in 2014, compared to a recent peak of 9.2% in 2010; the leadership has some serious challenges to overcome if Turkey is to achieve its goal of becoming one of the world’s 10 largest economies by 2023.

 
1.       The Lack of a Competitive Edge

Turkey’s competitiveness – its ability to compete in a global market place – is hampered by high costs and low productivity.  To some extent this has been helped by currency depreciation, which has lowered costs, but the underlying issues of low productivity, a need to continue to move further up the value added chain, and a burdensome regulatory environment remain.

Real Growth in Productivity in Turkey and BRIC: 2008-2013

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Source: Euromonitor International from ILO)/Eurostat/national statistics/IMF

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Recent Posts

Strategy Briefing: Opportunities and Challenges in Global Participatory Sport

The Scottish Referendum: Better Together or Divided We Stand?

Three Trends in Primary Education in Emerging Markets

Big Data: What’s the Big Deal?

The Rich World of Emerging Markets

China Dominates Boom in Emerging Market Patent Grants

Eurozone Q2 GDP Figures Point to a Bump in the Road Rather than a Return to Recession

Who Will Gain Most from Russia’s Food Import Sanctions?

Holidays and Vacations in the Post-Recession Economy

Turkey’s Five Big Challenges